Conference announcements:

As usual you can find the important dates in the calendar on the right

  • 6th FAERE workshop on the economics of green innovation is now available (see the attachment). MINES ParisTech (Paris, France) on 5-6 December 2016. You can obviously participate without presenting a paper. There is no registration fee, but you need to register by sending an e-mail to matthieu.glachant@mines-paristech.fr.
  • 10th Belgium Environmental Economics Day (BEED 2017), February 24 2017, KU Leuven, Campus Brussels. submission deadline: January 7th 2017, send email to sandra.rousseau@kuleuven.be
  • 5th International Symposium on Environment and Energy Finance Issues, Paris, 22-23 May 2017; deadline for paper submission 5th March 2017 https://isefi.sciencesconf.org/. Eric Strobl, Cees Withagen and myself organize the environmental economics part of this conference
  • The Institut D’Economie Industrielle (IDEI) and Toulouse School of Economics (TSE) are pleased to launch the Call for papers for the 11th Conference onThe Economics of Energy and Climate Change” in Toulouse on June 6-7, 2017. Submission deadline: January  22,  2017
  • 23rd Annual Conference of the European Association of Environmental and
    Resource Economists EAERE, Athens, 28 June – 01 July 2017, Papers should be submitted here. The deadline for paper submissions is 31 January 2017. Paper submitters will be notified as to the outcome of the peer review process on 30 March 2017
  • 8th International Research Meeting in Business and Management, Nice, 5-6 July 2017; deadline for paper submission 15 April 2017. Eric Strobl, Cees Withagen and myself we will organize the environmental economics subconference
  • For those who have missed the recent Sustainability workshop in Rouen, here is a video of the presentations: https://webtv.univ-rouen.fr/channels/#2016-2nd-workshop-sustainability

Many questions have been asked about the reasons behind #Brexit, about why Trump made it into oval office, the recent surge in right-wing political power in Europe, and I think the answers tend to be wrong. I think the answer to why these decisions were taken is really simple: Because their right-wing politicians provide the most convenient answer. And that is dangerous. Let me elaborate.

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Last evening I attended a discussion, organized by the Mouvement Écologique (Luxembourg’s biggest organization for sustainable development), about the possible direction that Luxembourg should take when it comes to its future. Invited speakers were Professor Reinhard Loske and Professor Harald Welzer, and the moderation was done by the never-fatigued Blanche Weber. In this post I will discuss what Luxembourg’s politicians should think about when they discuss policy options that influence Luxembourg’s future.

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Hinkley Point is a big mistake and even worse it seems to be getting the green light from the UK government. After Brexit this is now the second major, long-lasting political wrongturn by our friends from the island this year. I just received this statement from Tom Burke, chairman of the well-known climate think tank E3G, which he allowed to be published in its entirety:

Following reports today that the Government is about to give the green light to the Hinkley Point C nuclear power station, E3G, a leading climate change think tank, said it would be a hugely expensive strategic mistake, using expensive 20th century technology that would soon be obsolete.

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After a longer summer break I am finally back with someindex news: I am very happy that Ian Bateman, the editor of the journal Environmental and Resource Economics, has asked me to be part of the editorial board. This journal is among a handful few environmental economics journals that I feel has constantly managed to attract interesting and novel articles, so it will be a pleasure to work with them.

My approach as co-editor is as follows:

  1. Have a fast reviewing process
  2. The aim is for papers at the top level in environmental and resource economics
  3. In spirit with the journal: It is not enough to have a nice paper with which nothing  is wrong, but there must be something catchy that readers will find interesting.

If you feel that your article fits these criteria, then please do not hesitate and submit!

Logo-COP22

 

There was an interesting panel discussion (Climate and energy policy after the Paris Agreement) at the excellent EAERE 2016 conference in Zurich with Scott Barrett (Columbia University), Lucas Bretschger (ETH Zurich), Thomas Sterner (University of Gothenburg) and Herman Vollebergh (Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency and Tinbergen University), all four of whom have been widely involved in climate negotiations or research thereof. So I chased them up in order to get their views on what economists should do, or prepare for, to help make COP22 in Marrakesh successful.

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